About Dead Angels

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Three years ago Shari Darling sent her second husband, Carl Paskel, to prison for molesting her eight-year-old daughter. Carl has been released on parole, and is now living an exemplary life. He seems repentant, but Shari has seen a secret, darker side. The bodies of young girls begin to appear. Poems, claiming responsibility for the crimes, are being sent to detective Tom DeMayo. Tom and Shari are friends, although Tom hopes the relationship will grow. The scientific evidence points to Dale Richards, who recently completed a thirteen-year prison term for beating and molesting young girls. Russell Blaine reaches out to Shari from prison. He was Carl’s cellmate, and he claims to have a psychic connection to Carl. He alleges Carl is killing the girls and is preparing to come after Shari.

Moving to a stunning crescendo of horror and suspense, Dead Angels follows Shari as she learns to take control of her life. Ultimately, her love will not save her, Russell’s psychic powers will not save her, Tom’s science will not save her. Bruised, broken, and naked she must face her deepest fears with nothing but her anger to protect her.

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Dead Angels Book Reviews

This is riveting—some of the best hardboiled writing I’ve read in a long time. Tightly woven plot, realistic characters, both emotion inspiring and menacing, and a pace that belies the word count. Truly an exceptional effort.

iUniverse Writer’s Digest Review

First and foremost I feel compelled to mention right at the start of this review that Glen R Stott's novel, “Dead Angels” is blessed with incredibly strong characters. The protagonist Shari Darling, the catalyst of the story and great champion I think of the victims of the horrible actions perpetrated within is as strong a female lead as any I have come across. She has her weak moments of course, but they only stand to show how formidable she is in the face of horror; as has been said: It's how well you walk through the fire that counts. Shari Darling walks fiercely through, fighting all the way for what's right. She is helped by another force of nature, her friend, detective Tom DeMayo, a cop in a crime thriller that manages, thanks to Mr. Stott's skill with invention and characterization, not to be a cliché.

We have tough doings in this novel. Child molestation. Serial killing. Subverted truths, abused affection, manipulation. The justice system is black marked here just by the fact of the freedom given back to horrible beings undeserved of it. It is all very much heavy going. It would be intolerable reading if the trajectory wasn't done by the author with roller coaster precision turns, if there wasn't a caring story laid bare with people you can care about. We as a reader worry for Shari and her people. We root for Shari and Detective DeMayo. We are brought into the action by Stott and his writing prowess allows us to live the action and therefore feel the fear and the longing for right that the good inhabitants here do. Thriller may be too light a word for “Dead Angels.” It has so much gut and soul in it. The misdirections are perfectly plotted. You are on the edge of your seat experiencing something that counts for so much. When the reigns are pulled back, the pace slowed does not dull because it is then you find understanding for Darling and the rest in her world.

The ending of this novel, without giving too much away, has a bloodlust so ferociously deserved that it had me cheering as if for a favorite Olympian going for gold. Some simply deserve the fates they court. I say unabashedly, three cheers for Shari Darling. The evil characters in this book are drawn with bullet accuracy; they are not one dimensional and we learn anew, as we should, what cunning they employ right out in the open of everyday lives. The ugliness here is hard to take. It is softened only by the righteousness of Mr. Stott's agenda. He brings us into hell and exposes devils. The right debts are paid. We are able to go along (and I never wanted to stop reading) for the terror ride because of the diamond cut angle of the writing. The storytelling is magnificent. Shari Darling is to be loved. I want more of her life. And that is the highest compliment that can be paid.  

F.T. Donereau

Oily, paranoid, grim. “Dead Angels” by Glen R. Stott is an uncomfortable book, one that before any further reading should carry the warning that it touches on very sensitive material, and while it does not do so in any way gratuitously, or without proper understanding of the horror of the topic, it does not hold back or shy away from exploring it. This is a book about murder, abuse, and rape from the perspective of a convicted child sex offender.

Three years ago, Shari Darling sent her husband, Carl, to prison for molesting her daughter, Tami. Carl has been released on parole, having successfully proven himself to the authorities to be a reformed citizen. Shari is unconvinced. Soon her discomfort and anxiety is fed by anonymous letters, dead bodies and Carl’s ex-cell mate who seems to have his own answers. Shari’s friend, Detective Tom DeMayo, is handling the case. The evidence points to another convicted child molester, Dale Richards, who is also on parole, but cannot be found.

Click here to read the complete Dead Angels book review by James Grimsby.

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By James Grimsby for selfpublishingreview.com

When asked if I would be willing to read and review “Dead Angels” by author Glen R. Stott, I had to stop and give the request some serious consideration. On the one hand, a fictional book about child molestation and serial killings is not my normal reading genre, but on the other hand I had previously read/reviewed Stott’s book: “Heart of the Bison,” a non-murder mystery, and I had enjoyed it. With that said, I am glad I took the time to read “Dead Angels...”

I will say that “Dead Angels” turned out to be a fast-paced, nail-biting read. A must read for anyone who enjoys reading mystery or murder mystery. But! Please keep in mind that due to its content “Dead Angels” is not recommended and/or appropriate for all readers or all ages.

Charline Ratcliff for Rebecca's Reads

 

 

Dead Angels Book Excerpts